Nigeria, largest oil producer in Africa

Nigeria, largest oil producer in Africa

Nigeria is the largest oil producer in Africa. It holds the largest natural gas reserves on the continent and was the world’s fifth–largest exporter of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in 2018.


Although Nigeria is the leading crude oil producer in Africa, production is affected by sporadic supply disruptions.


Nigeria’s crude oil and natural gas resources are the mainstay of the country’s economy. Because Nigeria heavily depends on oil revenue, its economy is noticeably affected by crude oil price changes. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) projects that Nigeria’s crude oil and natural gas exports earned $55 billion in 2018, which is $23 billion higher than in 2016.


The growth in export revenue, which can be partly attributed to the rebound in crude oil prices, has helped improve Nigeria’s fiscal position. However, Nigeria’s fiscal deficit remained flat at 4% of its gross domestic product (GDP) because of a significant increase in capital expenditures and lower–than–expected non–oil revenue collection, in spite of improvements to the country’s tax administration. The Nigerian government still heavily relies on crude oil and natural gas revenue; its non–oil revenue comprises only 3.4% of GDP, one of the lowest in the world.


Sector organization


Recent updates
In September 2018, President Muhammadu Buhari vetoed the Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB) that was passed by the legislature in March 2018, which delayed efforts to liberalize the oil and natural gas sector and restructure the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). The PIGB is one of four separate bills that were taken from the previous version, the Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB). Latest reports indicate that the National Assembly is drafting a new version of the PIB and is hoping to pass the bill by the end of 2020, although when or if this action will occur is unclear.


The Nigerian government passed the Finance Act 2020 in January 2020. This act amends a number of tax laws and is aimed at improving tax participation and collection and modernizing the tax system. Provisions in the bill, such as the Petroleum Profits Tax (which repeals a tax exemption for dividends paid from after–tax profits), a value–added tax (which increases from 5% to 7.5%), and the Companies Income Tax (which requires Nigerian companies to deduct and withhold tax on payments to any foreign company that provides them with technical or professional services), are likely to affect oil and natural gas companies and increase their overall cost of doing business in the country.


The Finance 2020 Act follows a November 2019 amendment to the 1999 Deep Offshore and Inland Basin Production Sharing Contracts Act, which changed royalty rates for deepwater (specifically greater than 200 meters in water depth) and inland basin contracts (which comprise onshore basins aside from the Niger Delta) to 10% and 7.5%, respectively.


The amendment also introduces an additional royalty tax rate that ranges from 0% to 10% based on the price of crude oil. Given that international oil companies (IOCs) primarily operate in the deepwater fields in Nigeria, this amendment is likely to increase government’s share of revenue generated from these fields and to lead investors to re–evaluate their investment plans for currently producing fields as well as new–source development.

Source: U.S. Department of State

Petroleum and other liquids
Exploration and production
According to the Oil & Gas Journal, Nigeria had an estimated 37.0 billion barrels of proved crude oil reserves by the end of 2019–the second–largest amount in Africa after Libya.


The majority of reserves are along the country’s Niger River Delta and offshore in the Bight of Benin, the Gulf of Guinea, and the Bight of Bonny.


As a member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), Nigeria renewed its commitment to reduce crude oil production in April 2020, capping its production at 1.41 million barrels per day (b/d). The agreement takes effect on May 1, 2020, and ends on April 30, 2022. However, Nigeria’s compliance with the OPEC+ agreement has been intermittent; the country has at times produced more than the agreed-upon quota in the past. In addition, Nigeria has designated some of its crude oil streams as lease condensate, which is not subject to the OPEC+ agreement production cuts, which allows Nigeria to circumvent its obligation to reduce production.


In 2019, Nigeria produced about 2.0 million b/d of petroleum and other liquids, of which 1.65 million b/d was crude oil. The remainder is composed of natural gas plant liquids, other liquids, and refinery processing gains.


Source / More information : U.S. Department of State


Report by: OGP/Segun Cole , Please email us your industry related news for publication [email protected]
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