U.S. imports of crude oil from Africa fell by more than 90 percent between 2010 and early 2014

U.S. imports of crude oil from Africa fell by more than 90 percent between 2010 and early 2014

African crude oil exports to the United States averaged 170,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) for the first four months of 2014 as rapidly rising U.S. crude production has reduced U.S. refiner demand for imported light sweet crude oil. Historically, U.S. refiners have been major consumers of African crude oil, primarily light sweet crude from Nigeria, Algeria, and Angola, with the United States taking 2 million bbl/d, or about one-quarter, of African crude exports as recently as 2010.
African exports to other global regions reflect both changes in exports to the United States and the repeated and extended disruptions in Libyan production that have occurred since 2011. African crude that until recently flowed to the United States has been diverted to serve European markets that have historically been served by Libya and to supply increased demand in Asian markets where, despite Libyan disruptions, deliveries of African crude have increased
European refiners have historically imported substantial volumes of light sweet crude oil from Africa (2.2 million bbl/d in 2010), including over three-quarters of Libyan exports (1.1 million bbl/d in 2010). With most Libyan crude oil off the market, exports to Europe from the rest of Africa have increased by more than 700,000 bbl/d from 2010. European imports of crude oil from Africa have also increased to offset the 900,000 bbl/d decline in North Sea crude oil production since 2010. As a result, despite much lower imports of Libyan crude oil, total European imports of African crude oil in 2014 have fallen by only 100,000 bbl/d since 2010.
African crude exports to Asia have increased by more than 200,000 bbl/d since 2010. So far in 2014, exports to Asia from African countries other than Libya have increased by 400,000 bbl/d compared to 2010 levels,
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